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The Tushnovs' House

The Tushnovs' House

Nowadays:

The Court of Arbitration of the Republic of Bashkortostan

When a new road prospekt Salavat Yulayeva was laid, this house remained almost the last one of those of Malaya Ilyinskaya Street (Vorovskogo Street in the Soviet era). The house itself was saved only through the interference of the community. In early 1990s during the construction of what was intended to be prospekt Salavata Yulayeva, the house was sentenced to destruction. The press, however, started printing protests of prominent Ufa citizens, regional ethnographers and artists. Community...
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  • How to visit?
      Address:
      7 Salavat Yulayev avenue
      Phone:
      +7 (347) 272-59-60
      Business hours:
      Mon-Thu 8.30a.m.-5.45p.m., Fri 8.30a.m.-4.30p.m.
      E-mail:
      info@ufa.arbitr.ru
      Public Transport Stop:
      Vorovskogo
  • History

      When a new road prospekt Salavat Yulayeva was laid, this house remained almost the last one of those of Malaya Ilyinskaya Street (Vorovskogo Street in the Soviet era). The house itself was saved only through the interference of the community. In early 1990s during the construction of what was intended to be prospekt Salavata Yulayeva, the house was sentenced to destruction. The press, however, started printing protests of prominent Ufa citizens, regional ethnographers and artists. Community leaders were guarding the house even at night. As result the authorities cancelled their previous decision.

      According to the recollections of political exiles who visited Ufa, in the middle of the19th century this site at the confluence of the Nagaika River with its nameless confluent, as well as the site of the widely known ancient settlement Ufa-2, was occupied by the huge building of prison. The photo of 1867 shows its outline. According to the one-day census of 1879, though, this land plot already belonged to Appolinariya Dynkova. Besides, the census states that at the moment all the buildings in the quarter were made of wood.

      Approximately in late 1880s Dynkova married Vladimir Khrisanfovich (Khristianovich) Tushnov. Reference books and address calendars of Ufa governorate do not mention his name. According to local ethnographer Zinaida Gudkova, V. Tushnov was a building contractor at Samara-Zlatoust railway. Tushnov’s descendants in Moscow, to the contrary, claim that he was "a famous Ufa publisher, who went bankrupt because of cheap publications for common people". Both sources, however, agree that Tushnov committed suicide by "blowing out his brains" in order to save his wife and son from poverty. The heirs had a small rent income from the huge house on Malaya Ilyinskaya Street.

      The house was, obviously, built in early 20th century. Designed by an unknown architect, this house, a brilliant sample of the so-called brick style, turned out to be the largest on the street. The huge building was literally overhanging the ravine of the Nagaika River and snow-white stone wing of Dynkova, which had been constructed earlier (it was demolished during the construction of prospekt Salavata Yulayeva). Contrary to Dynkova wing, the new Tushnovs’ building looked gloomy: white key stones of the windows and white decorations of parapet columns were the only bright elements against the brick background. An attic, parapet columns, and fanciful frieze along the façade pointed at the symmetry of the building. Nevertheless the entrance in the right side of the street façade was emphasized with an avant-corps.

      Soon after the death of V. Tushnov the heirs sold the house, and it was used as what in modern terminology is called a TB dispensary. It operated till the early 1990s. The wooden house in the yard was occupied by the TB hospital.

      The fates of Tushnov’s heirs are of interest. His son Vadim was born in 1892. In 1914 he married a Sorbonne graduate Ludmila Blok, a daughter of former Ufa Vice-Governor and State Counselor Ivan Blok (1858-1906), an uncle of a famous poet. By that time her father had been at rest from toil in the family charnel house of the Tushnovs in the St. Sergius cemetery of Ufa. He died, though, through violence away from Ufa. He was literally blown to pieces by a bomb explosion. It happened in 1906 on Moskatelnaya Street of Samara, where Blok served as a Governor. But when he was a Vice-Governor in Ufa two of his daughters married: Antonina married a colonel and hereditary nobleman Tikhon Yefremov, whereas Ariadna married Ufa horse breeder Nikolay Lyakhov, also a hereditary nobleman. For some reasons the family of the deceased Governor was in point of fact pushed away from Samara, and his daughters moved the body of their father to Ufa and buried him. In 1937 the charnel house was still in the cemetery. After the war, though, the marble slabs were taken away for housekeeping needs.

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