List of Sites

Lobanov's House

Lobanov's House

Nowadays:

Bashkortostan Republic Office of Federal Drug Control Service

The first buildings appeared in this district in the first half of the 19th century. According to the 1879 census spot No.33 of the 2nd city district belonged to Sofya Yachmenyova. By 1897 the site was already owned by Ivan Lobanov, where he built a stone house with a wooden extension, wooden flanker and horse stable. According to 1908 and 1911 information books the house already belonged to his son, merchant Aleksandr Lobanov, owner of a ready-made shoe shop and a number of shoe stores in...
  • Audio story
  • How to visit?
      Address:
      29 Kommunisticheskaya Street
      Phone:
      +7 (347) 251-07-47
      Business hours:
      Mon-Fri 9.00a.m.-6.00p.m.
      E-mail:
      gnkrb@ufacom.ru
      Public Transport Stop:
      Aksakova, Kommunisticheskaya
  • History

      The first buildings appeared in this district in the first half of the 19th century. According to the 1879 census spot No.33 of the 2nd city district belonged to Sofya Yachmenyova. By 1897 the site was already owned by Ivan Lobanov, where he built a stone house with a wooden extension, wooden flanker and horse stable.

      According to 1908 and 1911 information books the house already belonged to his son, merchant Aleksandr Lobanov, owner of a ready-made shoe shop and a number of shoe stores in the city. In 1904 it was decided to assign numbers to land plots in Ufa. Lobanov’s site was assigned number 29. This number remained in the Soviet age and exists until now. The street name, though, is a matter of surprise. Initially the street was named after the cemetery, because there was a cemetery below the current Tsuryupy Street. After landowner Anichkova erected a church at the cemetry, the street was named after Dormitory Church. The part of this street to the west of Verkhnetorgovaya Square was called Sennay Street until the end of the 19th century. The street was named Bolshaya Uspenskaya (Big Dormitory Street) at the beginning of the 20th century only. From May 1918 it was named Yegor Sazonov Street, sinse 1937 it was renamed into Stalin Street. After the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1961 the street was renamed in Kommunisticheskaya Street.

      Two-storey elongated building along the street was built around 1909. The building was constructed in the so called brick style. Many researchers, though, refer it to neo-classicism. The major (southern) façade faced Uspenskaya Street. Its windows are framed with arch stones. Façade features active decoration: rustic-like first floor level, order details of the second level, the spaces between arched windows are filled with lesenes. The symmetric center of the building is decorated with a three-window topping and a figured attic above the central entrance showing the construction date and demolished initial letters of the owner’s name: 1909 and A.L. Both sides of the attic are decorated with openwork grating. The yard wing is perpendicular to the face wing and extends into the yard. The building also features unique chimneys made of figured brick with funnels and pikes at the top. It is a sample of mastership of a professional architect. Obviously, it is unlikely that we shall ever find out his name.

      Unfortunately, today it is hard to find out whether the house was used by the merchant’s family or it was used as tenement building, i.e. as apartments for rent. There is more evidence, though, for a tenement building. After 1911 the house was occupied by Volga Hotel. In the Soviet age the building was used by a local department of law-enforcement agencies Joint State Political Directorate and Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs (OGPU-NKVD). In late 1980s thousands of empty cartridge cases were found in the basement.

      The building is squeezed between the extension buildings of 1930s. One of them was occupied by Dzerzhinsky typography for quite a long time. Symmetrical balconies with iron fencing at the left and right flanks have been removed. Red brick façade walls have been painted green. For almost 10 years starting 1980s Lobanov’s House was occupied by Soyuznefteotdacha scientific and production company. Later it was given to tax police. Currently the building is occupied by the Bashkortostan Republic Office of Federal Drug Control Service.

      From the viewpoint of Ufa architecture of the 20th century the building is very interesting. In 1992 it was put under state protection as a historical and architectural landmark of Republican significance.

  • Photo
  • Show on map
      loading map...
4644
12
To top