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The Kochkins' Tenement Building

The Kochkins' Tenement Building

Nowadays:

Residential building with offices

In 1879 this land plot belonged to Feodor Kochkin. Back then it was Sennaya Street. When it was connected to Uspenskaya (Kladbishchenskaya) Street it was renamed into Bolshaya (meaning "big") Uspenskaya Street. Since 1918 it was called Yegora Sazonova Street, since late 1930s it was Stalina Street, since November 1961 it was called Kommunisticheskaya Street. The house numbers remained almost the same. Judging by the 1967 photo in the middle of the 19th century this quarter was occupied by...
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  • How to visit?
      Address:
      35 Kommunisticheskaya Street
      Public Transport Stop:
      Bashgosfilarmoniya
  • History

      In 1879 this land plot belonged to Feodor Kochkin. Back then it was Sennaya Street. When it was connected to Uspenskaya (Kladbishchenskaya) Street it was renamed into Bolshaya (meaning "big") Uspenskaya Street. Since 1918 it was called Yegora Sazonova Street, since late 1930s it was Stalina Street, since November 1961 it was called Kommunisticheskaya Street. The house numbers remained almost the same.

      Judging by the 1967 photo in the middle of the 19th century this quarter was occupied by one-storey buildings. By the end of the century the situation started changing. By 1910 there remained only one one-storey building at the intersection with Gogolevskaya Street. It belonged to O.A. Sidorov. Obviously, it was a residential building. All other houses between Gogolevskaya and Alexandrovskaya Streets were choke-full of trading companies. In 1911 the two adjacent stone houses Nos. 35 and 35/1, which belonged to Praskeva and Yevgeniya Kochkins (obviously, mother and daughter because the 1908 reference book mentions Praskeva Kochkina as the only owner) were occupied by the Kochkin's inn; Hygiene Drugstore; technical office and warehouse owned by Nikolay Konshin, an engineer; Smekhov's watch store and Severnyie Nomera Hotel. Judging by the photo, the Kochkins' houses were also used by Fishman's store (presumably male clothes), but there is no information about it in the reference books.

      In early 1910s the adjacent wooden two-storey house (now house No. 37a) owned by Yevdokiya Bobrova was occupied by Alexander Volkov's photographer's parlor. The next house No. 37, which also belonged to Bobrova, was obviously built in the early 20th century and was used by Kommercheskoye Podvorie Hotel. Besides Bobrova's house was also occupied by two cheap canteens: Varshavskaya and Kommercheskaya. The facades of the Kochkins' and Bobrova's houses were symmetric and before the construction of house No. 37 in the late 1930s both hoses looked so similar to each other that one could think that they belonged to one person. But it was not true. The rooms of the mentioned hotels (Severnyie Nomera and Kommercheskoye Podvorie) faced the cozy yard between the facades of houses Nos. 35/1 and 37. We can assume that these houses were designed by the one and the same architect, but until now there was found no evidence for it. The names of the architects are also unknown.

      On one of the old photos one can clearly see the construction date of the left Kochkins' house: 1906. Despite the fact that both parts of the building were built in the prosperous "brick style" of the early 20th century, these parts are far from being the same: the left part has a richer decoration. It features large keystones (imitation) on the windows of the second floor, posh attic contour and a graceful frieze between the floors. The only parapet column at the left, obviously, remained after the erection of the central part of the building featuring architectural details of the Russian Revival style (window of the second floor and the attic). The right part of the building (L-shaped, with a long yard façade) was obviously constructed later to become a tenement part of the building. Maybe it is for the sake of economy that the architect decided not to extend the decorations of the major façade and copied the planning of Bobrova's House with its Kommercheskoye Podvorie Hotel.

      In the middle of 1930s at the corner of Gogolya Street the land plot, which previously belonged to O. Sidorov, was used to build a five-storey house. Now it carries a memorial plaque, which says that a famous writer Sergey Dovlatov was born in this house. After that the appearance of the quarter almost never changed apart from major façade of house No. 37, which lost its initial decoration because of the 3rd floor added to the building.

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