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Polikarpov's House

Polikarpov's House

Nowadays:

Residential building with offices

In 1879 this spot on the southern side of Sennaya Street belonged to Konstantin Nabatov. Back then the quarter was neither rich nor developed: along the street up to the crossroads with Malaya Kazanskaya (Sverdlova) Street there were only thirteen houses, including one stone house with iron roof. Since then the street was changed several names. First it was united with Kladbishchenskaya Street, and the new united street was named Bolshaya Uspenskaya after the name of the church which was located...
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  • How to visit?
      Address:
      34 Kommunisticheskaya Street
      Public Transport Stop:
      Zentsova, Aksakova (Kommunisticheskaya)
  • History

      In 1879 this spot on the southern side of Sennaya Street belonged to Konstantin Nabatov. Back then the quarter was neither rich nor developed: along the street up to the crossroads with Malaya Kazanskaya (Sverdlova) Street there were only thirteen houses, including one stone house with iron roof. Since then the street was changed several names. First it was united with Kladbishchenskaya Street, and the new united street was named Bolshaya Uspenskaya after the name of the church which was located in the lower part of the street. As early as 1918 it was named after Yegor Sozonov (Sazonov). But in the late 1930s this Ufa's central street was named after Stalin, because of the Moscow authorities coming to the town. In November 1961, though, a directive from Moscow ordered to rename this street. That's how it acquired its present-day name Kommunisticheskaya Street.

      In 1908, 1911, and 1914 this land plot was owned by Ivan Polikarpov. The 1911 advertisement says: "The partnership of Polikarpov brothers: steam drum mill for granular flour on Miass Plant of Orenburg Governorate. Granular flour is traded in their own stores in Miass, Zlatoust, and Ufa". Obviously, this building was not only a house for living but also an office. Flour was traded in the Polikarpov brothers store on Verkhne-Torgovaya Square and in the Ivan Polikarpov's store.

      The exterior of the house resembles that of the house of the Tushnovs on Malaya Ilyiskaya (Vorovskogo) Street. Decorations, though, are unique for this city, which means that the unknown architect is most likely to be a non-resident of the city. The brick style features are also uncommon for the city: windows are flanked with engaged columns and feature an archivolt with an impost supplemented with balusters. The attics are interconnected with cast-iron fencing with small dormer windows at the flanks of the building.

      In the Soviet age this house was given to the faculty members of the Institute of People's Education (later Timiryazev Pedagogical Institute) to live in. One of the flats was used by Moisey Pizov, an author of over twenty articles on the works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Kaverin, Goethe, Balzac, Shakespeare, Heine, and on the mutual influence of Russian and Western European literature. During the war Moisey Pizov worked part-time at the Literature Institute of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences which was evacuated to Ufa. In 1942 he defended a doctoral thesis, and the ensuing year he was given the title of Assistant Professor (dotsent) at the chair of Russian and general literature of the pedagogical institute. He was given two luxury rooms in the Polikarpovs' house and provided a telephone connection.

      Pizov transformed his flat into a kind of literary salon. One could come here to discuss new books and to argue about them. These events sparkled ressentiment of neighbors and teachers of the institute. Later during the interrogations they claimed that Pizov tried to exert anti-Soviet influence on his guests. They interpreted these literary disputes as boozes and quarrels.

      On April 15, 1950 Pizov was arrested. He was accused of anti-Soviet propaganda in war-time. He was sent to a concentration camp near Irkutsk. In three years being consumptive he came back to Ufa. Until his death Pizov held a chair of Russian and general literature of Bashkir State University.

      In the 1990s the building underwent repair and restoration and was given to the Writers Union of the Republic of Bashkortostan.

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