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The Old Believers Dushins' Houses

The Old Believers Dushins' Houses

Nowadays:

Dwelling house

In accordance with the 1879 census a district excise office, a parish school (obviously, the first parish school), two coaching inns for travelers, two blacksmith shops, a grocery, a wine store, a bakery, an eatery, fur-coat and carpenter's workshops were located in quarter 37. Besides, there lived 5 male and 5 female old believers in the quarter. A large estate at the corner of Staro-Zhandarmskaya (later named Suvorovskaya, Petr Garmonov, Krupskaya Street) and Bolshaya Uspenskaya Streets...
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  • How to visit?
      Address:
      63 Kommunisticheskaya Street
      Public Transport Stop:
      Skver Mayakovskogo
  • History

      In accordance with the 1879 census a district excise office, a parish school (obviously, the first parish school), two coaching inns for travelers, two blacksmith shops, a grocery, a wine store, a bakery, an eatery, fur-coat and carpenter's workshops were located in quarter 37. Besides, there lived 5 male and 5 female old believers in the quarter. A large estate at the corner of Staro-Zhandarmskaya (later named Suvorovskaya, Petr Garmonov, Krupskaya Street) and Bolshaya Uspenskaya Streets belonged to an old believer Rodion Dushin.

      Initially the street was named Kladbishchenskaya (after the cemetery nearby) and formed the city's border. Later it was transformed into Bolshaya Uspenskaya Street named after the Assumption Church down the street. The street ended near the Bazarnaya (Verkhne-Torgovaya) Square. Its continuation was named Sennaya Street. In the late 19th century Sennaya was united with Kladbishchenskaya Street, and the new united street was named Bolshaya Uspenskaya after the name of the church which was located in the lower part of the street. In 1918 it was named after Yegor Sozonov (Sazonov). But in the late 1930s this Ufa's central street was named after Stalin, because of the Moscow authorities coming to the town. In November 1961, though, a directive from Moscow ordered to rename this street. That's how it acquired its present-day name Kommunisticheskaya Street.

      Supposedly Dushin's House was built in the 1870s. Its style (Eclecticism) complies with construction date. The architect is unknown. The quality of the molding materials, though, is still amazing: if you clean the house it looks like a newly built one. Even the dripstones over the windows survived (normally they suffer from atmospheric precipitations). Only the wrought iron canopy over the right entrance was lost; the surviving one is also badly damaged.

      In accordance with the 1898 property tax book, the northern side of Bolshaya Uspenskaya Street was occupied by a two-storey stone house and a two-storey semi-stone building, both being covered with iron. The houses cost 2,500 rubles. The corner house had a grocery store owned by Rodion Dushin.

      According to the 1908 and 1911 reference and tax books, until 1919 the land and house at the corner of Bolshaya Uspenskaya and Suvorovskaya Streets was still owned by Rodion Dushin.

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