List of Sites

Trade School

Trade School

Nowadays:

Bank Uralsib (Ufa branch)

The first Ufa Girls School with a 6-year curriculum similar to that of the gymnasium was opened on December 18, 1860. The class consisted of 25 girls. In June 1865 the school was transformed into a gymnasium. It was named after the Empress Maria Fedorovna (spouse of Emperor Paul I), who was the patroness of girls' educational institutions in Russia. As distinct from boys' schools, girls' school curriculum did not include ancient languages. The courses of mathematics, literature theory and of...
  • Audio story
  • How to visit?
      Address:
      41 Revolutsionnaya Street
      Phone:
      8-800-200-55-20
      Business hours:
      Mon-Fri 9.00a.m.-6.00p.m.
      Public Transport Stop:
      Aviatekhnikum, Bank Uralsib
  • History

      The first Ufa Girls School with a 6-year curriculum similar to that of the gymnasium was opened on December 18, 1860. The class consisted of 25 girls. In June 1865 the school was transformed into a gymnasium. It was named after the Empress Maria Fedorovna (spouse of Emperor Paul I), who was the patroness of girls' educational institutions in Russia. As distinct from boys' schools, girls' school curriculum did not include ancient languages. The courses of mathematics, literature theory and of some other subjects were limited, because one of the major tasks of this school was to prepare girls for "family duties".

      According to address calendar of 1876, apart from the 1st and 2nd parish schools for boys, there was a Mariinsky Girls School on Lazaretnaya Street (nowadays this 9 Lenin Street). Now we may only guess how four teachers (catechist, teacher, assistant teacher, and needlework instructor) could educate 99 girls. But according to the table in the same address calendar there were only four teachers. In accordance with the regulation on city schools as of 31 May, 1872, such schools provided six-year courses. Apart from the Scripture (which was obligatory) the curriculum also included reading and writing, Russian language, reading in Old-Church Slavonic, arithmetic, geometry practice, geography, and national history, natural history and physics, graphics, and drawing, as well as singing and gymnastics. The school accepted girls over 7 years old. As distinct from the gymnasium, the school did not have an acceptance trial. Upon completion of the four-year course, students could enter a gymnasium. Just like in gymnasiums, though, tuition was fee-based. At the same time some children from poor families could be exempt of payment liability upon decision of the teaching board.

      Before the early 20th century the school used a two-storey wooden building on Lazaretnaya Street. In the 1883 reference book the school was named Mariinsky Girls Primary School; in 1897 the name was different: Mariinsky Parish School. By that time there had been six teachers at school. At the same time the city grew larger, and the amount of students increased proportionally. In 1908 the school moved to 11 Tsentralnaya Street. In 1911 it was not included into the reference book, obviously, because it was moving to another place. Two places, actually: they were constructing two absolutely identical two-storey brick buildings with central heating (boiler-rooms in the basement) on Nikolskaya and Ivanovskaya Squares, which were called Mariinsky Girls School and the 2nd Girls School respectively. The 2nd Girls School (it was named Mariinsky only once on the 1927 photo of Apollony Zirakh) was built near the Ivanovsky cemetery and Commerce School. Nowadays this is 41 Revolutsionnaya (former Bogorodskaya) Street. The first Maariinsky School was located on 38 Sverdlov Street (now R. Nureyev Choreographic College).

      The idea of the unknown architect can be referred to neoclassicism embodied in the so-called brick style. It is a symmetric building with accentuated central part, arched windows of the second floor featuring keystones, massive central attic with a lucarne, columns and fence.

      After the revolution the building was used as a laboratory of the Aviation Institute and later Aviation College. The building was supplemented with a long wing. In the 1990s the building was purchased by Uralsib (Bashkreditbank). It was heavily reconstructed. After that they left only central and side facades.

  • Photo
  • Show on map
      loading map...
3741
7
To top