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Diocesan School for Girls

Diocesan School for Girls

Nowadays:

Republican Clinical Hospital for War Veterans

Ufa Diocesan School for Girls is a diocesan secondary Orthodox religious educational institution "for education of girls with clerical titles". The question of education of future priests' wives had been raised in Ufa diocese on numerous occasions, because priests had extensive capabilities for teaching in their parochial schools. But it was not until September 29, 1862 that the school was opened under the rule of Bishop Filaret (Malyshevsky). The urgent necessity of such institution is proved...
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  • How to visit?
      Address:
      48 Tukaev Street
      Phone:
      +7 (347) 250-77-04, +7 (347) 250-76-80
      Business hours:
      Mon-Fri 9.30a.m.-5.00p.m.
      E-mail:
      ufaqqw@mail.ru
      Public Transport Stop:
      Uchilishche Isskustv, Park imeni Lenina
  • History

      Ufa Diocesan School for Girls is a diocesan secondary Orthodox religious educational institution "for education of girls with clerical titles". The question of education of future priests' wives had been raised in Ufa diocese on numerous occasions, because priests had extensive capabilities for teaching in their parochial schools. But it was not until September 29, 1862 that the school was opened under the rule of Bishop Filaret (Malyshevsky). The urgent necessity of such institution is proved by the fact that it was maintained through the means of the Ufa Diocesan Trusteeship, which allocated 10 thousand rubles for the building, furniture and equipment alone. Besides, it made a commitment to provide up to 1 thousand rubles annually to maintain the school. Around three thousand rubles were collected by the diocesan clergy. Subsequently it was suggested to allocate up to 3% of the church income for this purpose. Yet, the funds were insufficient, that is why education was partially paid-for. Nevertheless, some alumni managed to study for free. For instance, in 1883 the school admitted five girls who lost their parents (clergy) and were supported by the diocese. The Convent of Annunciation, in turn, opened on its premises (now this is the spot of Drugstore No.5 at the corner of Kommunisticheskaya and Karl Marx Streets) a school for poor clergy girls, where they were provided with boards and lodging by the monastery and trained to enter the Diocesan School.

      In 1866 the Diocesan School for Girls occupied a two-storey stone Classicism building of the former Land Administration on Frolovskaya (later Voskresenskaya, now 48 Tukaev) Street of the first half of the 19th century. In 1863 the first 30 alumni graduated the school, in 1883 the amount increased to 191, in 1908 it reached 342.

      The school admitted clergy and secular children of 10-12 years old. The curriculum (6 classes 1 year each) featured reading and writing, arithmetic, geography, history (civil, Russian, world, Orthodox church), as well as the Scripture knowledge, church service, the study of local schism, church singing, calligraphy, and needlework. Since 1875 the students could opt to learn French. In the late 19th century the building was reconstructed several times. Due to addition and extension the initial building lost its initial outline almost entirely. By the early 20th century the school once again faced lack of premises. Thus, in 1902 another three-storey neoclassic annex featuring the so-called brick style was built. Unfortunately, the architect is unknown.

      The school was popular since its foundation. Soon it accepted children of all social classes. Since 1895 a girls' parochial school had been operating under the auspices of the Diocesan School. Upon graduation the alumni were given a diploma and title of a home teacher. It wasn’t until the late 19th century that the school opened an additional fee-based pedagogical class. In this one-year class the alumni studied methodology of teaching the subjects of the one and two-class public schools. After that the Diocesan School alumni were able to compete with the alumni of Girls’ Gymnasiums, who had advantages for teaching employments.

      In 1918 part of the building was occupied by the Governorate Headquarters of the Council of the People's Military Organizations. In 1919 the Diocesan School was closed, and the building was used to deploy military units. Since 1921 the building was occupied by four different Soviet party schools.

      In 1937 the building was used by an In-Patient Surgery Hospital. In 1941 the evacuated 1st Sechenov Medical Institute of Moscow was based on the premises of the hospital. Later the building was used by the City Clinical Hospital No.1. Afterwards it was given to the War Veterans Hospital. In the late 1950s the building of the former Diocesan School and the building of the former Boys Orphanage down the street were connected by the passage. The brick style of the Boys Orphanage featuring elements of the Art Nouveau and neoclassicism has been retained.

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