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The House where Writer S.T.Aksakov Spent his Childhood

The House where Writer S.T.Aksakov Spent his Childhood

Nowadays:

Aksakov's memorial house museum

This house on Mount Sluchevskaya is well-known not only in Ufa or Russia. "Back then we lived in Ufa, a governorate city, and occupied a huge wooden house of Zubin. The house was built on the mountain slope, so the windows facing the garden were very low from the ground, whereas the canteen windows facing the street were almost two meters above the ground-level; the entrance staircase had over twenty-five stairs, and you could see the Belaya River". Sergei Aksakov spent his childhood in this...
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  • How to visit?
      Address:
      4, Zaynulla Rasulev Street
      Phone:
      +7 (347) 276-83-52
      Business hours:
      Tue-Sat 11a.m.-5p.m.
      Public Transport Stop:
      Uchilishche iskusstv (Zaki Validi)
  • History

      This house on Mount Sluchevskaya is well-known not only in Ufa or Russia. "Back then we lived in Ufa, a governorate city, and occupied a huge wooden house of Zubin. The house was built on the mountain slope, so the windows facing the garden were very low from the ground, whereas the canteen windows facing the street were almost two meters above the ground-level; the entrance staircase had over twenty-five stairs, and you could see the Belaya River".

      Sergei Aksakov spent his childhood in this house. In the Soviet age, though, it was used as a dermatovenerologic dispensary. In 1966 it was almost destroyed: the so-called "Aksakov connoisseurs" claimed that Aksakov never lived in the house, and that his house burnt down back in 1821. These "historians" did not see the difference between the house where Aksakov was born (indeed, before it burnt down it was located on the territory of the present-day Aksakov public garden) and the house on the mountain slope, which belonged to Sergei's grandfather Zubov (in Years of Childhood it is call Zubin's house). Fortunately, the research carried out by local ethnographers Georgy and Zinaida Gudkov presented unquestionable evidence that this house is connected with the name of the great writer.

      Before that another Ufa historian Pyotr Ishcherikov undertook a research in order to simply find the building. You may think it is strange that a house with such "ancestry" was neglected by historians for so long. Aksakov was highly esteemed in Ufa: as early as 1891 to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the writer they named one of the city's major streets after Aksakov (back then it was an entrance into the city from the new railway station). The city and governorate heads must have thought of establishing a museum in the early 20th century. In the early 1900s an unknown photographer (obviously, it was O. German, an employee with the local photographer's parlor) made several photos of Aksakov's house. He made the photos of both western and southern facades in winter and in summer. He even climbed to the roof of the neighboring house to make a picture of the estate against the backdrop of the river. Negative images do not contain any notes, but photographer's interest in this place suggests that before the revolution everyone knew how significant it was. In 1908 they started constructing Aksakov People's House, and obviously they decided to establish Aksakov's museum later. It turned out that the museum wasn't established until dozens of years had passed. In 1900s they made an avenue of limes going down to Sluchevsky park. So they had to remove Aksakov's garden, and the former yard entrance became a front one.

      The owner of the house Yelena Kharitonova did not wish to rebuild the house or decorate it with carving (it was so popular in the late 19th century). Subsequently it made the restoration of the initial look easier. Initially the building did not resemble any architectural style. It was constructed in accordance with the project of an unknown architect. His works can be found nowhere else in the city.

      In mid-1980s the authorities devoted funds for the restoration of the house in the context of preparation to the writer's 200th anniversary. Finally in 1991 Sergei Aksakov museum was opened in Ufa.

      The museum's interior design was reconstructed from the detailed description in Childhood Years of Bagrov Grandson. During the reconstruction they even found the writing desk window of his grandfather Zubov (Zubin in the book). According to Zubov, the house was made of larch-tree, and it turned out to be very stable. Ishcherikov claimed that it was constructed in mid-1700s. If it is true, then it is the oldest building in Ufa.

      Nowadays this wooden building is occupied by Aksakov's memorial house museum.

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